Mission Statment

click me to Open or Close
"This is a non-profit, non-denominational and apolitical online discussion site, designed to support research and study of consciousness experiences, such as near death experiences and other spiritually transformative experiences, support experiencers and spread the message of love, unity and peace around the world. We do not allow proselytizing or bullying (please refer to our Joining Rules). We welcome and encourage people of all backgrounds, nationalities, countries and/or religions to bring up any topic they feel fit for this place and to read and participate in the conversations held here, in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere."
They..........didn't believe me!
You...........should stay quiet!
I................don't look at the world the same way!
17 posts Page 1 of 1
I wasn't sure where to post this, I guess "Social Aspects" is as good as any.

In March our local PBS station (KNME in Albuquerque) put out a call to victims of gun violence to come in and tell their stories, for a series on the topic they were putting together. I responded and went down for a 40-minute taped interview. It was a pretty wide-ranging interview, included every aspect of the experience, and was the first time I'd ever recounted my NDE before a complete stranger and a camera. I was told it would be edited down for inclusion with several other accounts, so I've naturally been curious to see what parts they would use.

Well, unbeknownst to me, the segment aired on July 1, which I only found out Wednesday. I think the editors (students) did a good job, but they cut out the entire NDE aspect, which is unfortunate. I was also hoping they would include more of the parts about the personal implications and consequences of guns and violence in society and less about the physical event. But I suppose what they included does fit into their "victims of gun violence" theme.

Anyway, there are two ways to access it. An 8-minute spot is on Youtube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Ro-IfdG1LY

And the entire program that was broadcast includes about 6 minutes of that.

http://www.newmexicopbs.org/productions/newmexicoinfocus/july-1-2016/

The gun violence segment is in the 4th section. The segment contains 5 interviews. In the upper left corner of the video box, select segment 4. My interview begins about 16:30 in. I found a couple of the other stories before mine pretty interesting too. The Greek guy is a friend-of-a-friend, a much-loved local elementary school teacher and he too is lucky to be alive.
Hi Precaud,
It is very unfortunate that they cut the nde aspect of it out.. is there a way that you can retrieve a copy of the taped segment with that part? And maybe ask their permission to submit that portion on youtube on a different account? I would love to hear it. : )
(Do you also have your story submitted to the nderf/oberf site? If so can you please provide a link for it?)

(The part where you were recounting why you turned away from guns as a child made me cry. Very sad and touching, and I'm glad that event reached to your heart and spoke to you.)

Thanks for sharing this! It takes a lot of courage to go on tv and speak your mind about these difficult subjects. : )
Hi prism,

It's an interesting suggestion. I'll email the interviewer and see if she can retrieve the entire content. Though, the account given there was not nearly as complete as what is submitted here:
http://www.nderf.org/NDERF/NDE_Experien ... e_7834.htm

Thanks for your kind words, but I don't really have difficulty talking about it anymore, though I am sensitive to how it's being received. If I feel something critical or judgemental coming toward me, I shut down. I have no interest in defending my experience to skeptical scrutiny. That said, it rarely comes up, and when it does, there's typically little interest. Most folks run away from anything that even remotely reminds them of the inevitability of their own demise. I think its very healthy, and promotes presence of mind. "Live like there's no tomorrow" doesn't mean 'to live recklessly with abandon', but to remind ourselves of the temporary nature of our appearance here.

It's yet another piece of wisdom that blows reincarnation and christian concepts of "eternal life" out of the water. :D
Thank you for the link. : )
That being said, it is interesting how certain things, nde's in this case, can alter our perception of life so much that it can change our very personality. Maybe not overnight with some, but the event dwells and grows in the back of our minds, until we either come to accept it, or dismiss it.

Precaud wrote: Most folks run away from anything that even remotely reminds them of the inevitability of their own demise. I think its very healthy, and promotes presence of mind. "Live like there's no tomorrow" doesn't mean 'to live recklessly with abandon', but to remind ourselves of the temporary nature of our appearance here.


See, I would agree with you there, if I wasn't more inclined to think that a lot of people don't want to own up to the consequences for their actions, during their life review for example. Instead of the fear of death in itself. If they believe there's nothing after life, then that gives them the freedom to do what they want, when they want, on this Earth with no repercussions. And with no regard how their actions may affect others. I feel like I am all too aware of the ramifications of how our actions affect others, so I am constantly wanting to make others happy, even at my own detriment. Even if they hurt me. And if I hurt others, my sadness for them intensifies and I beg for forgiveness... even if I didn't hurt them and only think I did. XP Or even if I had good reasons for doing so. :\
I am not quite at that middle ground yet where I can accept that these things happen for a reason and all I can do is try my best to live a nice, caring life.

(Sorry if I derailed off the subject there... ;))
Precaud wrote: Well, unbeknownst to me, the segment aired on July 1, which I only found out Wednesday. I think the editors (students) did a good job, but they cut out the entire NDE aspect, which is unfortunate. I was also hoping they would include more of the parts about the personal implications and consequences of guns and violence in society and less about the physical event. But I suppose what they included does fit into their "victims of gun violence" theme.


Thank you so much for posting the link to the video, Precaud. It was a real pleasure to see you in person! I remember reading the account of your NDE when I first joined the forum, but it was a completely different experience to read it after watching yourself talking about the circumstances that led to it.

One thing I thought you could do, if you feel like doing it now that you have had the opportunity to talk about your NDE in front of complete strangers, is recording a Youtube video of your own, which is your own intellectual property, and share it with the world.

It is indeed unfortunate that you were only allowed to say you were dead for two hours. I don't know about Mexico, but here in Italy the media seem to be basically focussed on spreading fear, without mentioning all the wonderful things that happen in the world every day. Not only does this cause people to live a fear- and scarcity-based life, but it is morally harmful for young people, for future adults, who are the ones who truly have the practical means of making the difference.

I understand the educational purpose of speaking about the victims of violence, but denying the public the opportunity to see the bigger picture, such as your NDE and the way it changed your life, is something that in my opinion is a deliberate act of mass hypnosis, which can only benefit a few!
Hello from Italy - How I found out about NDERF - A Strange Experience
prismreverie wrote: Thank you for the link. : )
That being said, it is interesting how certain things, nde's in this case, can alter our perception of life so much that it can change our very personality. Maybe not overnight with some, but the event dwells and grows in the back of our minds, until we either come to accept it, or dismiss it.

Hi Prism,
Yes, and I would go further and say, if it doesn't change us, change our personality, then something is very wrong with it, metastasized in its current form!

See, I would agree with you there, if I wasn't more inclined to think that a lot of people don't want to own up to the consequences for their actions, during their life review for example. Instead of the fear of death in itself. If they believe there's nothing after life, then that gives them the freedom to do what they want, when they want, on this Earth with no repercussions. And with no regard how their actions may affect others.

Huh? So, in order to be valid, life has to design something so that those who are least honest with themselves can't "game" it? No offense intended, but this is pretty undisciplined thinking. When we're attempting to "decode life", to understand workings in the big picture, I don't think we should allow our minds to throw it off course by cooking up unrelated and irrelevant criteria. Minds are good at that sort of thing. There are times and places for that sort of imagination-driven thinking, but this isn't it.

(Sorry if I derailed off the subject there... ;))

Thanks for recognizing that! It went off on a tangent quickly...
Giulia wrote: Thank you so much for posting the link to the video, Precaud. It was a real pleasure to see you in person! I remember reading the account of your NDE when I first joined the forum, but it was a completely different experience to read it after watching yourself talking about the circumstances that led to it.

Hi Giulia, yes, having some sort of "feel" for a person does make a difference in our perception. And then just the basic difference between how we process written material versus visual and auditory media. The latter is definitely more personal and less imaginative. And, I would argue, less complete.

One thing I thought you could do, if you feel like doing it now that you have had the opportunity to talk about your NDE in front of complete strangers, is recording a Youtube video of your own, which is your own intellectual property, and share it with the world.

Thank you for the interesting suggestion. I'll give it some thought.

It is indeed unfortunate that you were only allowed to say you were dead for two hours. I don't know about Mexico, but here in Italy the media seem to be basically focussed on spreading fear, without mentioning all the wonderful things that happen in the world every day. Not only does this cause people to live a fear- and scarcity-based life, but it is morally harmful for young people, for future adults, who are the ones who truly have the practical means of making the difference.

I understand the educational purpose of speaking about the victims of violence, but denying the public the opportunity to see the bigger picture, such as your NDE and the way it changed your life, is something that in my opinion is a deliberate act of mass hypnosis, which can only benefit a few!

I understand your points, but if we step back and look at the bigger picture, I don't feel there was anything sinister going on in this situation.
1. A group of UNM graduate students were being given an opportunity to produce some short videos for inclusion in the TV station's weekly editorial broadcast. The content of those shows covers quite a bit of ground. The theme of "gun violence" was decided ahead of time.
2. When I responded to their call, I sent them a link to my NDE account on this website, and said, here is my experience of gun violence; there was no shooting per se, but if you think any of this material is relevant, I'd be happy to talk to you. Having done media production and editing (audio), and knowing the importance of "thematic consistency", I would have been surprised if they had included the NDE portion. It doesn't really fit the theme.
3. Just FYI, New Mexico is not Mexico, it is a state in the USA, and a place that is happily free from most of the narrow-minded neurosis that afflicts this nation. :)
Precaud wrote: Huh? So, in order to be valid, life has to design something so that those who are least honest with themselves can't "game" it? No offense intended, but this is pretty undisciplined thinking. When we're attempting to "decode life", to understand workings in the big picture, I don't think we should allow our minds to throw it off course by cooking up unrelated and irrelevant criteria. Minds are good at that sort of thing. There are times and places for that sort of imagination-driven thinking, but this isn't it.


Hi Precaud,
I think this portion was misunderstood.
A healthy dose of perspective is wonderful, but that's what I believe a lot of people don't do. That's what I mean when I say a lot of people don't want to own up to their actions. They simply don't think about "life" in the grand scheme of things and our ultimate purpose here, and instead are too busy with what society is throwing at us/telling us what should be considered the norm. So our minds get clouded with school/job/relationships/politics/entertainment/gossip/news/sports/etc. and don't have the time, or care in some cases, about their actions and the ramifications that it will cause both in this life, and the afterlife.

The good news is, when someone does post their nde/ste account on youtube, the positive reactions far outweigh the negative, and it's very encouraging to see that a lot of people are opening their heart and mind to accepting these experiences, and trying to live a better and conscientious life because of it. *hint hint, wink wink* ;)

Giulia wrote: I understand the educational purpose of speaking about the victims of violence, but denying the public the opportunity to see the bigger picture, such as your NDE and the way it changed your life, is something that in my opinion is a deliberate act of mass hypnosis, which can only benefit a few!


I know what you mean Giulia. The news outlet (in this case the tv segment at least made it clear that they were interviewing for gun violence) seems to usually show that which fits their own agenda, for ratings... shock value... or other hidden motives. :\

Precaud wrote: 3. Just FYI, New Mexico is not Mexico, it is a state in the USA, and a place that is happily free from most of the narrow-minded neurosis that afflicts this nation.


I would like to visit there then. :P
prismreverie wrote: Hi Precaud,
I think this portion was misunderstood.
A healthy dose of perspective is wonderful, but that's what I believe a lot of people don't do. That's what I mean when I say a lot of people don't want to own up to their actions. They simply don't think about "life" in the grand scheme of things and our ultimate purpose here, and instead are too busy with what society is throwing at us/telling us what should be considered the norm. So our minds get clouded with school/job/relationships/politics/entertainment/gossip/news/sports/etc. and don't have the time, or care in some cases, about their actions and the ramifications that it will cause both in this life, and the afterlife.


Ah, ok, got it. Sure, it would be nice if everyone made time for self-reflection (or, better yet, were capable of it on the fly), though I take issue with overly concerning oneself about the so-called "afterlife".

The good news is, when someone does post their nde/ste account on youtube, the positive reactions far outweigh the negative, and it's very encouraging to see that a lot of people are opening their heart and mind to accepting these experiences, and trying to live a better and conscientious life because of it. *hint hint, wink wink* ;)


:) point taken :)

Precaud wrote: 3. Just FYI, New Mexico is not Mexico, it is a state in the USA, and a place that is happily free from most of the narrow-minded neurosis that afflicts this nation.

prismreverie wrote: I would like to visit there then. :P

I find that an open landscape with wide vistas definitely contributes to a more open-minded perspective on things. But the high desert is not everyone's cup o' tea, as witnessed by the state's relatively low population... which, to my mind, is a huge plus... ;)
Precaud wrote: Ah, ok, got it. Sure, it would be nice if everyone made time for self-reflection (or, better yet, were capable of it on the fly), though I take issue with overly concerning oneself about the so-called "afterlife".


I think maybe we (humanity) need a nice balance of this Earthly life, and that of the spiritual.
A lot of nde's give the message that what we do here on the physical plane is important to our spiritual growth, so it seems that both go hand in hand. : )

The good news is, when someone does post their nde/ste account on youtube, the positive reactions far outweigh the negative, and it's very encouraging to see that a lot of people are opening their heart and mind to accepting these experiences, and trying to live a better and conscientious life because of it. *hint hint, wink wink* ;)


Precaud wrote: :) point taken :)


;)
I made a video almost a year ago... that I've been thinking about posting on youtube, since some people like to hear/watch videos instead of reading, so it's something I think can be beneficial in spreading the word.

Precaud wrote: I find that an open landscape with wide vistas definitely contributes to a more open-minded perspective on things. But the high desert is not everyone's cup o' tea, as witnessed by the state's relatively low population... which, to my mind, is a huge plus... ;)


That sounds nice, actually. Sounds peaceful and more carefree, than being in a busy city environment. Some people enjoy the city life, and some would rather not. I personally like the peace and quiet. : )
Precaud wrote: I understand your points, but if we step back and look at the bigger picture, I don't feel there was anything sinister going on in this situation.


I will try and rephrase what I said.

I don’t know about other countries, but in the country where I live the media tend to suggest that life is basically violent, and it is my belief there is a deliberate intent not to dwell on all the wonderful things that we (seven and a half billion people) experience every day.

My feeling is that only a few are benefitting from this scaremongering strategy! It is my hope that sharing (as we are doing here) the wonderful experiences NDErs come back with and how these have changed their lives will give future adults food for thought and the freedom to wake up from the scare- and scarcity-based frame of mind that surrounds us, at least over here.

I have no preconceived ideas about geographical places I don’t know and I see nothing sinister in young people doing their work in the best way they know how. :)
Hello from Italy - How I found out about NDERF - A Strange Experience
Giulia wrote: I will try and rephrase what I said.
I don’t know about other countries, but in the country where I live the media tend to suggest that life is basically violent, and it is my belief there is a deliberate intent not to dwell on all the wonderful things that we (seven and a half billion people) experience every day.


I understand, Giulia. You were making large, general comments about the nature of what we call here the MSM (Main-Stream Media). And I agree with what you said. It is mostly corporate-financed and reflects the priorities of those entities.

But what these kids were doing is different. There are no financial interests involved. PBS is (mostly) publicly funded and administered in cooperation with numerous state universities around the country. Maybe it is a different state of affairs than in Italy, I don't know. And this was a great opportunity for several students to produce media for broadcast as part of their graduate work. IMO, this was a good situation for all involved.

Cheers.

prismreverie wrote: I think maybe we (humanity) need a nice balance of this Earthly life, and that of the spiritual. A lot of nde's give the message that what we do here on the physical plane is important to our spiritual growth, so it seems that both go hand in hand. : )


In a general sense, I agree, especially with the "hand in hand" part. And I completely support the motives and life-priorities you're referring to. I think there are better ways to describe it, though. Specifically, I disagree with:
1. The notion of "improving things in the afterlife".
2. Emphasizing "spiritual growth" as something separate and distinct from the "physical plane".

As well-meaning as they may be, I think these are mistaken priorities and ill-conceived ideas that perpetuate the very split they describe. I think our guiding concepts should embody integration, wholeness, bringing things together and finding ways to express them and give them form, in our personality and in the world. The fixation on the afterlife and the spiritual is escapist, a diversion. "Making it matter" is more to the point. So-called "spiritual growth" is really "personal growth", and that means work on oneself.

I made a video almost a year ago... that I've been thinking about posting on youtube, since some people like to hear/watch videos instead of reading, so it's something I think can be beneficial in spreading the word.


Please let us know if/when you post it!
Precaud wrote: In a general sense, I agree, especially with the "hand in hand" part. And I completely support the motives and life-priorities you're referring to. I think there are better ways to describe it, though. Specifically, I disagree with:
1. The notion of "improving things in the afterlife".
2. Emphasizing "spiritual growth" as something separate and distinct from the "physical plane".

As well-meaning as they may be, I think these are mistaken priorities and ill-conceived ideas that perpetuate the very split they describe. I think our guiding concepts should embody integration, wholeness, bringing things together and finding ways to express them and give them form, in our personality and in the world. The fixation on the afterlife and the spiritual is escapist, a diversion. "Making it matter" is more to the point. So-called "spiritual growth" is really "personal growth", and that means work on oneself.


Hi Precaud... in all honesty, I have no idea why the disagreements are there in the first place. Yes, I originally disagreed with this statement:

Precaud wrote: Most folks run away from anything that even remotely reminds them of the inevitability of their own demise. I think its very healthy, and promotes presence of mind.


I think people running away from the concept of our purpose here (life and death) is just keeping them grounded to the physical/material plane, instead of exploring the reasons why we're here, which in my experiences, and those of a lot of near death experiencers, is simply to love and forgive. If we could all do that, that would be helping us both on this planet, and our spiritual growth. Again, hand in hand... so other than that above statement, we are pretty much agreeing - except you don't like the way I word things, or are assuming what I'm saying: "2.Emphasizing "spiritual growth" as something separate and distinct from the "physical plane".? :|

Ever since I came on to this forum, I've been trying to promote love/kindness/forgiveness/compassion... those are our direct links to helping bring spiritual growth to the physical world. ...So I really have no idea why these misgivings? :\
Precaud wrote: ...what these kids were doing is different. There are no financial interests involved. PBS is (mostly) publicly funded and administered in cooperation with numerous state universities around the country. Maybe it is a different state of affairs than in Italy, I don't know. And this was a great opportunity for several students to produce media for broadcast as part of their graduate work. IMO, this was a good situation for all involved.


No need to explain that, Preacaud, at least as far as I am concerned. I will refrain from saying where my almost 19-year-old son is now, what he is doing, and how the media (and those who are in a public position of authority) presents it. I think these kids are precious and possibly much wiser than we were when we were their age, possibly also thanks to what we, as adults, have been able to share with them about what we have been through. We are in this together!
Hello from Italy - How I found out about NDERF - A Strange Experience
prismreverie wrote: Hi Precaud... in all honesty, I have no idea why the disagreements are there in the first place.
So I really have no idea why these misgivings? :\


My dear prism,

Please relax... there are no misgivings here and nothing personal intended. We're just discussing ideas.

Giulia wrote: No need to explain that, Preacaud, at least as far as I am concerned. I will refrain from saying where my almost 19-year-old son is now, what he is doing, and how the media (and those who are in a public position of authority) presents it.


OK thanks, I wasn't sure if understanding was present or not :) But now you have me curious about what your son is up to! :}
Precaud wrote: My dear prism,

Please relax... there are no misgivings here and nothing personal intended. We're just discussing ideas.


Okay, thank you Precaud. : )
And thank you again for sharing your tv segment with the forum. : )


And Giulia, I am also interested in what your son is doing... I have a feeling what it might involve, and I just hope everything will be okay.
What I think may happen when we give away our intellectual property rights is that it no longer is our personal story, which is why I suggested representing the whole story with a personal video.

I sometimes refer to the people I know to provide examples, but, based on what I just said, I realise it is not fair. So I'll offer an example about what happened to me, to explain why I think personal stories are best conveyed by the person who experienced them in the first place, irrespective of the well-meaning efforts made to convey the story to others.

Back in 1996 I was interviewed in Turin about out-of-the-body experiences. When the show was broadcasted on TV,

- I was presented as speaking from Siracusa (in Sicily) rather than from Turin [So I understand what getting mixed up between Mexico and New Mexico may involve].
- The person conducting the interview was not my interviewer, but a complete stranger, who simply kept nodding.
- They used parts of an interview made to a rather dogmatic Professor who was actually in Turin at the time I had been there to comment on my words (whereas he was talking about a completely different topic).
- They used the soundtrack and pictures from the 1990 movie Flatliners to make the whole thing more appealing (or spooky?)

This is a completely different story, of course: it is just an example of why I tend to encourage those who have a story to share to do so, if they feel like doing it, especially if they feel it offers hopeful and beneficial views to the public.
Hello from Italy - How I found out about NDERF - A Strange Experience
17 posts Page 1 of 1

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests