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Hospice and coordinating end of life issues
Hopefully some member can help us make this a larger, more helpful section


[mishaframe710]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hospice[/mishaframe710]
Thank you Misha. This subject is of interest to all. It can be a controversial and emotive topic - but it does need airing. I look forward to seeing the input on this matter. I should like to hear of others' personal experiences.
My sister-in-law was taken to a Hospice last Saturday. My husband and I, and two of her daughters, spent two hours with her yesterday. I was grief stricken to see her so changed from a few weeks ago. 15 months ago, after ignoring two breast lumps, she finally went to a doctor. The lumps were removed but she refused any other treatment at all, preferring alternative, fringe remedies. Her health over the last 15 months has deteriorated rapidly and we were so upset to see what has become of the pretty woman, who had curly brown hair and twinkling brown eyes, in such a short time. She was almost beyond recognition. Thank God she is not in any pain. She has almost stopped eating and has to be persuaded to drink.

Her daughters told us that she did not speak at all on Friday. Yesterday, Saturday, while we were with her she talked continuously - much of it was incoherent or made little sense. All her life she has been a spiritual person. Gentle, kind and extremely generous - always seeing the good in everyone. I've heard her say, often, and when she was in robust health, 'I'm looking forward to dying. Heaven is wonderful and it's where we belong.' Yesterday, among the very few intelligible things she said were, 'I don't want to die!', 'Don't let me die!', and, 'I want to get stronger, get out of here and go home!', and, 'The nurses keep giving me medication that I don't want - they're secretly trying to poison me!'

She told me, a long time ago, that she had memories of being a Jewess, with her small son, in a Concentration Camp in Germany in WWII. She was born into this life in 1943 and said that she had chosen to come back to earth quickly.

My nearest and dearest who have already passed on have usually done so very suddenly & unexpectedly. I've never seen a loved one dying in such a distressing way. Although she isn't in pain she is mentally distressed, confused, in denial and suspicious of people. When faced with this I have to remind myself that this isn't the dear girl I know and that when she passes she will be the glorious, strong, spirit that she has always been.
My dear sister-in-law went to the Light this afternoon. She will be overjoyed!!
Sorry for your loss Cathy. If many of the NDEs are to be believed, your sister-in-law is likely now experiencing a phase of consciousness far better than anything WE can imagine.
I know you are right Misha! It is the family still in this world who suffer her loss.

She was a pure-hearted and good woman. It was a privilege to know her.

Yesterday morning we were talking about her last life - which she remembers! - and she said that she didn't want to come back to this world. Then she stopped talking and slept. She died, in her sleep as she wished, at 3.00pm this afternoon.
CathyK wrote: Yesterday morning we were talking about her last life - which she remembers! - and she said that she didn't want to come back to this world. Then she stopped talking and slept. She died, in her sleep as she wished, at 3.00pm this afternoon.


Cathy, I am so sorry to hear about your sister-in-law but at the same time (please don't take this in the wrong way) I am so happy for her.

When my sister (12 years older than I) first told me she had just been diagnosed with lung cancer last September, day before my birthday, I thought, "How lucky you are! You are going to find out what it's like to be dead." Not that I don't want to live but since I have been fascinated by death, dying and bereavement since I was 12, I am kinda looking forward to finding out what's really going on and what happens when we die. I also envied her because she was going to see all our deceased loved ones.

She put up a good battle against the cancer but she and I both knew she wouldn't win and it was her time to go. She decided to go to a hospice and went downhill fast. My daughters and I drove from Dallas to Baton Rouge as fast as we could and got there 6 hours before she died. She couldn't talk and was in and out of consciousness and I knew from the deep, shallow breaths she was taking that it wouldn't be long. I made my daughter, a nurse, lower the guard rail and I gave her a kiss on her forehead while in my head I said, "Goodbye, Big Sisser." She died April 21, 2015. As she was like a mother as well as a sister to me, it has been very hard for me.

Now back to science...In thinking about ways to design experiments to gather information about NDE's, it occurred to me that the best places to go to where people die are hospitals and hospices. NDE's that occur due to car wrecks, electrocution, etc. are also sources of NDE's but the best places to go where most people die are hospitals and hospices. Not to sound cold-hearted but if people who knew they were dying would volunteer to be connected to monitors while they die, we could gather more data on what happens at the moment of death. And if they are able to vocalize things they are experiencing as they pass, that could be recorded and added to a data base.

I don't know if society has advanced enough to tolerate science infiltrating their taboos and rituals but everything that was going to happen could go on just as if the doctor and monitors weren't even there. One of my hypotheses is that even though we may exit these bodies as some forms of energy, there may be something visible on a different wavelength of light than is visible to the human eye. We need to experiment to find that wavelength, if it exists. That's why if you are going to film/record people as they die to see if anything comes out of the body you will need to go where most people die.

I think a lot of people would be interested in volunteering for near death studies especially if they could feel like they are contributing to science before they die. I know I would and my sister would have volunteered if there had been such a study. Of course, the doctor and hospice would have to agree to be a part of the study and all kinds of legal mumbo-jumbo would have to be signed.
The Rose, if you want to research discarnate souls I suggest you talk to some serious spiritualists. They can probably set you up to measure related phenomena without all the ethical and legal implications of research at the death-bed. Positive results there could then be confirmed to carry over to the death bed with limited specifically targeted research.
Hello Therose

What you have said is very interesting!
if people who knew they were dying would volunteer to be connected to monitors while they die, we could gather more data on what happens at the moment of death. And if they are able to vocalize things they are experiencing as they pass, that could be recorded and added to a data base.


I agree with you. Many, many people would be happy to volunteer in such research - I would be agreeable to it.
My next door neighbour told me that when his wife died, a white 'puff of smoke' drifted out of the top of her head. I know that experiments were done, around the turn of the 19th/20th centuries, to measure the weight of the bed and the dying patient. It was claimed that a tiny amount of weight was lost at the moment of death.l
I read somewhere that the room lit up when George Harrison, (one of the Beatles), died.

These phenomena and similar lend themselves to accurate measurement and seem a logical bit of research to undertake.

The shortcomings of the Sam Parnia research were obvious when it was first mooted and were predictable. At the point of death people will not be in a 'mental' or emotional state to look for the 'signs & clues' that have been planted there for them to notice.

Cathy
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