Hospice Worker's Experiences

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LifeReview
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Hospice Worker's Experiences

Post by LifeReview » Tue Feb 18, 2014 7:25 pm

I've heard that nurses and hospice workers have a lot of experience with deathbed visions and transition guides. I hope they can inform us here more about it. I heard that seeing guides is such an accurate predictor of death, that even more materialistic doctors will keep a closer eye on otherwise very stable patients if they start to discuss visions. And then there is the shared death experience. That just blows my mind!



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Re: Hospice Worker's Experiences

Post by CathyK » Thu Feb 20, 2014 6:05 pm

Shared death experiences are awe inspiring. I've read one or two on NDERF's accounts.

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Re: Hospice Worker's Experiences

Post by ano1 » Thu Apr 03, 2014 11:43 pm

I can tell you that, last week for three days before he died, my father-in-law spoke to people only he could see. He verbally mentioned by name - his wife, mother and one brother. This was witnessed by myself, my husband and the hospice workers.
I have also seen this happen many times in my work.

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Re: Hospice Worker's Experiences

Post by LifeReview » Fri Apr 04, 2014 5:44 am

Hi ano,

Very interesting. Thank you for sharing that with us.

If I may ask, with your father-in-law, did you interpret that as dementia, medication, hallucination, or as an objectively real spiritual experience?

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Re: Hospice Worker's Experiences

Post by CathyK » Fri Apr 04, 2014 9:18 am

Hi Misha

The day before my sister-in-law died she told me that Nurses at the Hospice had asked her if she could "see things which were not there". She told me that it was none of their business so she just told them, "No". It was a strange question.

Cathy

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Re: Hospice Worker's Experiences

Post by Marguy » Fri Apr 04, 2014 12:15 pm

Hi Cathy,

Maybe in hospices today the nurses are more aware of this type of happenings than in past times. It also could be that they have joined with a study about this type of experiences.

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Re: Hospice Worker's Experiences

Post by CathyK » Fri Apr 04, 2014 1:12 pm

Hi Marguy

Yes, I had thought of this possibility. Also the possibility that perhaps morphine can cause hallucinations (?) and they were just checking?

The phrasing of the question was not very good. If a dying patient saw 'some thing', to them it would be real. They would not think that they were seeing "something which wasn't there". The question almost invites the answer 'No' !

Cathy

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Re: Hospice Worker's Experiences

Post by Marguy » Fri Apr 04, 2014 2:07 pm

correct!

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Re: Hospice Worker's Experiences

Post by CathyK » Fri Apr 04, 2014 2:34 pm

For a couple of years, 1982 -1983, I worked two nights per week in a Nursing Home. Several people died during that time but, unfortunately, I didn't witness any patient having visions of loved ones they would soon meet.

I read an account that when George Harrison, (the Beatle), died, the room filled with light.


Cathy

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Re: Hospice Worker's Experiences

Post by dnix71 » Fri Apr 04, 2014 7:23 pm

Antigonish http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antigonish_%28poem%29

Yesterday, upon the stair,
I met a man who wasn't there.
He wasn't there again today,
I wish, I wish he'd go away...

When I came home last night at three,
The man was waiting there for me
But when I looked around the hall,
I couldn't see him there at all!
Go away, go away, don't you come back any more!
Go away, go away, and please don't slam the door...

Last night I saw upon the stair,
A little man who wasn't there,
He wasn't there again today
Oh, how I wish he'd go away...

Also

There was a man upon the stair
When I looked back, he wasn't there
He wasn't there again today
I think he's from the CIA.

And if you preferred Tony Blair as UK PM over Gordon Brown

In Downing Street upon the stair
I met a man who wasn't Blair.
He wasn't Blair again today.
Oh how I wish he'd go away.

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Re: Hospice Worker's Experiences

Post by ano1 » Fri Apr 04, 2014 8:16 pm

Misha:
Very interesting. Thank you for sharing that with us.

If I may ask, with your father-in-law, did you interpret that as dementia, medication, hallucination, or as an objectively real spiritual experience?
This was before he had any morphine or other such medications. To me he was 'seeing' those people and 'interacting' with them in a very objective way. The day prior to these communications he spoke directly to us as he normally would.

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Re: Hospice Worker's Experiences

Post by ano1 » Fri Apr 04, 2014 8:26 pm

Marguy: Hi Cathy,
Maybe in hospices today the nurses are more aware of this type of happenings than in past times. It also could be that they have joined with a study about this type of experiences.
I think this is true. I also think, as nurses, we should be observant... but believe we need to butt out and let this very personal time be scared to the ill person and those they encounter without our interruption. In my experience, these encounters are very precious and private. If asked questions about it they usually will brush aside questioning, and rightfully so...this is their time, not ours.

I hope that makes sense.

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Re: Hospice Worker's Experiences

Post by Marguy » Sat Apr 05, 2014 3:53 am

You are right ano1.
If one wants to know for a study or so, there are probably more subtle ways to ask for it.
I would even suppose that if the patient is trusting the nurse he/she might even talk by him/her self about it.
A good example was E.Kübler-Ross.

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Re: Hospice Worker's Experiences

Post by CathyK » Sat Apr 05, 2014 5:56 am

HI dnix71

That made me smile. There are so many parodies of this! I especially like the CIA reference - haven't heard that one before!

Cathy

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Re: Hospice Worker's Experiences

Post by LifeReview » Sat Apr 05, 2014 3:24 pm

"I think this is true. I also think, as nurses, we should be observant... but believe we need to butt out and let this very personal time be scared to the ill person and those they encounter"

I think you mean sacred, right?

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Re: Hospice Worker's Experiences

Post by CathyK » Sat Apr 05, 2014 4:26 pm

I think she did mean 'sacred' Misha. Typo.

Cathy

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Re: Hospice Worker's Experiences

Post by ano1 » Sat Apr 05, 2014 11:23 pm

Yes, my meaning was 'sacred'. That's what we get when I stay up too late.

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Re: Hospice Worker's Experiences

Post by ano1 » Sat Apr 05, 2014 11:35 pm

Marguy: You are right ano1.
If one wants to know for a study or so, there are probably more subtle ways to ask for it.
I would even suppose that if the patient is trusting the nurse he/she might even talk by him/her self about it.
A good example was E.Kübler-Ross.
You are right.

I remember Dr. Kubler-Ross, at a conference, actually saying that one of her best hospice workers was a lady that had been a cleaning lady. One day, Dr. Ross entered a room of one of her patients to hear the patient speaking about very personal thoughts and an nde with the housekeeper.
She said, if I recall correctly, that listening is a gift but it is very difficult to actually teach this skill to someone. She seemed to value this lady very much.

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Re: Hospice Worker's Experiences

Post by CathyK » Sun Apr 06, 2014 5:01 am

That was nice Ann!

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